Category Archives: Media & Outreach

Scidmore, Takamine and ‘Homecoming’ Trees

Plaque describing the role of Jokichi Takamine and Eliza Scidmore in Japan’s cherry tree gift to Washington (Photo: D. Parsell)

Eliza Scidmore is popping up all over the place here in Japan. Her cameo appears on plaques that mark the presence of cherry trees that have been grafted from the trees in Potomac Park—scions of the 3,000 trees Japan sent to Washington a hundred years ago. A couple hundred saplings of these “homecoming cherry trees” are being planted around the country.

It’s one of many U.S.-Japanese projects celebrating last year’s centennial of Washington’s cherry trees. Japan is also planting 3,000 dogwood trees that were a gift from the United States.

On the “homecoming tree” plaques Scidmore is paired with a famous Japanese chemist named Jokichi Takamine. It recognizes their dual effort in making the cherry trees in Washington a reality. Eliza had wanted for years to see it happen. And Takamine had previously offered to buy cherry trees for parks in New York City, where he lived, but officials there had not been receptive.

Jokichi Takamine

Scidmore and Takamine knew one another well. When they learned of Mrs. Taft’s landscaping plans for Potomac Park, they both saw a chance to act. Takamine offered to personally buy trees for the beautification project—he thought a couple thousand would be a good number to make a fine display. The Japanese consul general in New York, Takamine’s travel companion in Washington, suggested it would be more appropriate, for reasons of protocol, to make the trees a gift from the Japanese people rather than an individual.  Continue reading

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Filed under Cherry Trees, D.C. History, Eliza Scidmore, Japan, Media & Outreach

The Eliza Scidmore Society

When I started this blog more than a year ago, my first post was a photo of Eliza Scidmore’s grave site in Yokohama, sent to me by a Japanese friend. I knew at the time I would eventually have to travel to Japan to do research for my book on Eliza—and to see her grave site.

Today I joined members of the Eliza Scidmore Cherry Blossom Society (Sakura-no-Kai) at an annual memorial service at her grave.

Kaoru Onji places flowers at Eliza Scidmore’s grave in Yokohama. “Eliza Catherine” on the tombstone is the name of her mother, first buried at the site. (Photo: D. Parsell)

Kaoru Onji, a retired professor of organic chemistry, coordinates the activities of the Eliza Scidmore Society. Assisting her is Mina Ozawa, director of the Yamate Museum. This year about three dozen members of the Society and other guests gathered amid fierce winds for the brief ceremony, then enjoyed a buffet luncheon.

The society grew from a group of people who shared an interest in Eliza Scidmore‘s story after her book Jinrikisha Days in Japan was translated into Japanese. In 1987 they visited her grave during cherry-blossom season to pay tribute. The ritual has continued. Today the group has about 50 members. Continue reading

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Filed under Biography, Cherry Trees, D.C. History, Eliza Scidmore, Historical Travel, Japan, Media & Outreach, Research

A Gift of ‘Sakura’

On its evening news program last Saturday (March 30), NHK television in Japan aired a 10-minute segment about my research on Eliza Scidmore. It included scenes at a popular spot in Tokyo for viewing sakura (cherry blossoms).

Among the viewers who responded to the program was Akira Yamamoto. His chief hobby is photography, and he thought I might like having a photo he took that captured the meaning of sakura in Japan—the spirit of goodwill associated with cherry-blossom viewing.

With Akira Yamamoto and his photo of “sakura” (Photo by Yoshiko Yamamoto)

Today he and his wife, Yoshiko, invited me for coffee and presented me with a gift of the B&W photo, beautifully mounted in a frame. I look forward to hanging it in my home office in the States as a wonderful reminder of my trip to Japan. Continue reading

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Filed under Biography, Cherry Trees, Eliza Scidmore, Japan, Media & Outreach, Photos, Research

Off to Japan, in Eliza Scidmore’s Footsteps

By the Tidal Basin in Washington with reporter Miki Ebara, in front of the first two cherry trees from Japan planted on March 27, 1912, and a 300-year-old lantern from Japan (Source: NHK TV)

A busy Saturday. I just spent five hours with a film crew from the New York bureau of Japan’s NHK television, talking about my research on Eliza Scidmore.

Miki Ebara, the chief correspondent in New York,  first contacted me a year ago not long after I launched this blog. She covers disasters as part of her duties and was familiar with Eliza Scidmore’s reporting on the great tsunami on the northeast coast of Japan in 1896. 

Miki and I reconnected several weeks ago when I started thinking about making a trip to Japan for some necessary research. Cherry blossom season seemed the best time to go, so things have moved along very quickly. I’m off early next week. First trip to Japan.

Because she shares my fascination with Eliza, Miki decided to do a news feature on the cherry trees in Washington with a segment on my research, especially details I’ve uncovered about Eliza’s early life. The show is scheduled to air on March 30, when the trees in Japan should be at peak bloom.

Eliza has become increasingly well known in Japan because of her book Jinrikisha Days in Japan and her role in bringing cherry trees to Washington, so there’s much curiosity about her. There’s even an information sign about her posted outside one of Yokohama’s metro stations, near the cemetery where she’s buried. Continue reading

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Filed under Biography, Cherry Trees, D.C. History, Historical Travel, Japan, Media & Outreach, Research