Eliza Scidmore Slept Here …

In the course of research I’ve been finding addresses of various places where Eliza Scidmore lived or stayed over the years. Since she was such a vagabond, there were many! Here’s a photographic chronology of a few of them.

David Atwood House, Madison, Wisconsin.
David Atwood, editor and publisher of “The State Journal,” married the sister of Eliza’s mother. As a young woman Eliza was close to her cousin Mary Atwood. Eliza stayed here with the Atwoods during visits back to Madison, where she spent her early childhood years. (Source: Wisconsin State Historical Society)

Georgetown Visitation.
Eliza attended this Catholic boarding school in Washington from 1862-63, when she was around 6 to 7 years old. It opened in 1799 and is still operating today. (Source: Library of Congress)

 

“Idaho,” Juneau, 1887.
Eliza slept in a cabin aboard this steamer in the summer of 1883 when she made her first trip to Alaska via the Inside Passage. The wharf shown here was named for the ship’s captain, James Carroll, who became an early promoter of Alaska tourism. (Source: Alaska State Library)

 

Club Hotel, Yokohama.
Eliza and her mother stayed here on their first trip to Japan in the summer of 1885. The hotel, next to a popular men’s club, overlooked the harbor on an avenue known as the Bund. Later, Eliza and her mother lived next door, at No. 6 Bund, while Eliza’s brother George was a consular official in Japan. Today the site is occupied by the Hotel Monterrey. (Source: MeijiShowa)

 

Brunswick Hotel, Boston.
A lot of Washington residents fled the muggy city in the summer for fashionable spas or cooler places in New England. Eliza and her mother stayed at times at this popular hotel in Boston. (Source: Library of Congress)

 

Shoreham Hotel, Washington.
Built in 1887, this apartment hotel at H and 15th Streets, N.W., became a popular residence for members of Congress. Eliza was staying here in the fall of 1895 when she wrote to John Muir describing her recent “circumnavigation” of the Far East. It included a trip to Java she wrote about in one of her books. The hotel was razed in 1974 for an office building. (Source: unknown)

1837 M St., N.W., Washington.
Eliza resided in this house in the Dupont Circle neighborhood from around 1910 to 1912 [view is seen from around the corner, on 19th Street]. So she was probably living here when she attended the planting of the first Japanese cherry trees in Potomac Park on March 27, 1912, as a guest of First Lady Helen Taft. The American writer John Dos Passos later lived here for a time. (Source: Library of Congress)

Stoneleigh Courts, Washington.
By 1920 Eliza lived in No. 510 at this luxury apartment building that had as its major investors the former Secretary of State John Hay. Located at Connecticut and Massachusetts Avenues, now Dupont Circle, [Correction: located on Connecticut Avenue, just north of Farragut Square], it was built in an innovative horseshoe layout, with a central courtyard that allowed light to interior apartments. Eliza’s neighbors included many eminent people. (Source: Library of Congress)

31 Quai du Mont Blanc, Geneva, Switzerland.
This shows the site of the apartment building facing Lake Geneva where Eliza was living in at the time of her death in 1928. She had moved permanently to Geneva in part to follow developments at the League of Nations. She found the weather dreary much of the year, so she vacationed regularly with family and friends in southern Italy and France. (Photo: Jacques Lasserre)

 

Foreign General Cemetery, Yokohama.
Eliza’s final place of sleep is in a cemetery in Yokohama, where her ashes were laid with those of her mother and brother. Her inscription on the gravestone is beneath the cross. The overhanging cherry tree in bloom  was planted by Japanese who pay tribute to her every spring. It was propagated from one of the trees Japan gave to Washington in 1912. A plaque by the grave reads: “A lady who loved cherry blossoms rests here in peace.” (Photo: D.L. Parsell)

 

 

3 Comments

Filed under Biography, Cherry Trees, D.C. History, Eliza Scidmore, Japan, Photos, Research

3 Responses to Eliza Scidmore Slept Here …

  1. EW

    The Stoneleigh Court apartment building in Washington, D. C. was actually located at Connecticut Avenue and L Street, NW, a block north of Farragut Square in downtown D.C. The apartments were taken down in the mid-1960s and replaced by a modernist structure in 1966, the Blake Building, which still stands today, taking the address of 1025 Connecticut Ave., NW. The trolleys pictured in the postcard are heading to and from Farragut Square.

    http://www.streetsofwashington.com/2010/06/elegant-stoneleigh-court-apartments.html?q=stoneleigh

    • Thanks for the correction! I found in another source, “Old Washington, D.C., in Early Photographs” (Robert Reed, Dover Publications, 1980), the same photo of Stoneleigh Courts, with address as Connecticut and K Streets. It seems clear from your info and the photo that it extended for whole block between K and L Streets, with the horseshoe center facing Connecticut Avenue. Pretty fashionable address, which tells me Eliza Scidmore was doing quite well as a travel writer at the time.

  2. Pingback: Anniversary of Eliza Scidmore's Death | A Great BloomingA Great Blooming

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *